Amos Sniff


BirthJune 28, 1836
DeathMay 1, 1895
CemeteryElmwood (Elmwood)
PostKenesaw (Elmwood)
Unit16th Iowa Infantry, Company F

Private Amos Sniff

16th Iowa Infantry

Sniff was born in Ohio on June 28, 1836. He was residing in Fort Madison (Lee County), Iowa when he enlisted on January 24, 1862. He was mustered on February 24, 1862 and served over 3 years. He was mustered out on March 25, 1865 at Goldsboro, North Carolina. He was promoted to sergeant on November 19, 1862.

The 16th Iowa Infantry was organized at Davenport, Iowa between December 10, 1861 and March, 1862. During Sniff’s enlistment, the regiment fought in many major battles and campaigns. Some of them include:

Battle of Shiloh (TN) (April 6-7, 1862). The inexperience regiment suffered heavy casualties during the first day of the battle. Eighteen (18) soldiers were killed, 104 were wounded, and 15 were reported as prisoner-of-war or missing.

Battle of Iuka (MS) (September 19, 1862) was another costly battle. The regiment lost 15 soldiers, 50 were wounded, and 10 were reported as prisoners or missing.

The regiment fought at the Siege of Vicksburg (MS) from May 18-July 4, 1863. Fortunately, the casualty count was very low.

The unit was assigned to the Atlanta Campaign from June 8 to September 8, 1864. July 22, 1864 was the most costly day of the War for the 16th Iowa Infantry. The unit lost 3 soldiers, 14 were wounded, 119 were taken prisoner, and 120 were reported missing. Sergeant Amos Sniff was one of the members that was taken prisoner. He was sent to the infamous Andersonville Prison in Georgia and remained there until he was released via a prisoner exchange on September 22, 1864.

Some members of the 16th Iowa Infantry were part of General Sherman’s “March to the Sea” in November-December, 1864. It is unclear if Sergeant Sniff participated in his historic event.

Amos Sniff died on May 1, 1895 and is buried in the Elmwood Cemetery. He was a charter member of Post 123 (Elmwood) of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Note: Veteran bios were compiled and written by Dean Podoll.


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